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Why Royal Bee ?

Royal Bee Honey is the leader in honey exports from the country of India, offering top notch honey to the quality conscious consumers across the world. The group it has established itself as a premier Honey exporter to many countries of Europe, USA and the Middle East.

We have a well-equipped Processing or Refining, which comprises of sophisticated processing machines helping in imparting pure honey along with its characteristic colour, aroma, and beneficial attributes.

Our fully automated honey processing plant is equipped with ultra modern facilities, with a capacity to handle about 2200 MT annually, the company also maintains complete traceability for all honey from the farm level to match its quality with the trust of the customers.

We ensure that strict quality control guidelines are followed throughout the processing, packaging and transportation process of all varieties of Honey. These include small, bulk and other customized quantities according to the order requirements of our clients. We provide retail orders in measures viz25 gms, 50 gms, 100gms, 200 gms, 500 gms to 1 kg and as per the buyers requirements. Similarly, for bulk orders, we offer packaging of up to 30 to 300 kgs.

Honey ManufacturingProcess

Full honeycombs removed fromhive

  • To remove the honeycombs, the beekeeper dons a veiled helmet and protective gloves. There are several methods for removing the combs. The beekeeper may simply sweep the bees off the combs and guide them back into the hive. Alternately, the beekeeper injects a puff of smoke into the hive. The bees, sensing the presence of fire, gorge themselves on honey in an attempt to take as much as they can with them before fleeing. Somewhat tranquilized by engorgement, the bees are less likely to sting when the hive is opened. A third method employs a separator board to close the honey chamber off from the brood chamber. When the bees in the honey chamber discover that they have been separated from their queen, they move through a hatch that allows them to enter the brood chamber, but not reenter the honey chamber. The separator board is inserted approximately two to three hours before the honeycomb is to be removed.
  • The majority of the cells in the comb should be capped. The beekeeper tests the comb by shaking it. If honey spurts out, the comb is reinserted into the honey chamber for several more days. Approximately one-third of the honey is left in the hive to feed the colony.

Uncapping the honeycombs

  • Honeycombs that are at least two-thirds capped are placed into a transport box and taken to a room that is completely free of bees. Using a long-handled uncapping fork, the beekeeper scrapes the caps from both sides of the honeycomb onto a capping tray.

Extracting the honey from thecombs

  • The honeycombs are inserted into an extractor, a large drum that employs centrifugal force to draw out the honey. Because the full combs can weigh as much as 5 lb (2.27 kg), the extractor is started at a slow speed to prevent the combs from breaking.
  • As the extractor spins, the honey is pulled out and up against the walls. It drips down to the cone-shaped bottom and out of the extractor through a spigot. Positioned under the spigot is a honey bucket topped by two sieves, one coarse and one fine, to hold back wax particles and other debris. The honey is poured into drums and taken to the commercial distributor.

Processing and bottling

  • The honey is poured into tanks and heated to 120F (48.9C) to melt out the crystals. Then it is held at that temperature for 24 hours. Any extraneous bee parts or pollen rise to the top and are skimmed off.
  • The majority of the honey is then flash-heated to 165F (73.8C), filtered through paper, then flash cooled back down to 120F (48.9C). This procedure is done very quickly, in approximately seven seconds.
  • There are several methods for removing honey combs. The beekeeper can either sweep the bees off the combs and guide them back into the hive or inject a puff of smoke into the hive. When the bees sense the presence of fire, they gorge on honey in an attempt to take as much as they can with them before fleeing. Somewhat tranquilized by engorgement, the bees are less likely to sting when the hive is opened. Alternately, a separator board can be placed between the honey chamber and the brood chamber. When the bees in the honey chamber discover that they have been separated from their queen, they move through a hatch that allows them to enter the brood chamber, but not reenter the honey chamber.
  • Although these heating procedures remove some of the honey’s healthful properties, consumers prefer the lighter, bright-colored honey that results.
  • The honey is then pumped into jars or cans for shipment to retail and industrial customers.

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